About your Search

20130801
20130831
SHOW
News 69
Hannity 50
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWSW 456
MSNBCW 427
CNNW 180
MSNBC 176
FOXNEWS 162
CSPAN 148
FBC 130
CSPAN2 87
ALJAZAM 86
CNN 65
CNBC 57
KPIX (CBS) 46
KGO (ABC) 44
CURRENT 40
KTVU (FOX) 40
KQED (PBS) 37
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 2416
French 6
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,424 (some duplicates have been removed)
? and now, bbc "world news america." washington, from i'm kathy k. the obama administration makes the case, action against the syrian regime. >> the united states government 1429nows that at least syrians were killed in this attack. >> the president himself says he has not made up his mind, and any u.s. response to the chemical attacks will be limited. >> we are not considering any open-ended commitments, any boots on the ground approach. >> saying goodbye to seamus mosty, one of the world's treasured poets, has died at the age of 74. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america, and around the globe. inflicting messages from the obama administration about a possible military -- conflicting messages from the obama administration about a possible military intervention in syria. in muted remarks, the president insisted no decision had been made, and any action would be limited and narrow. is america going to attack the assad regime, and when? mark mardell starts our coverage. in a damascus suburb, witnessed second hand by the whole world is a challenge for america and its presid
this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years,and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? and now, bbc "world news america." washington, from i'm kathy k. the obama administration makes the case, action against the syrian regime. >> the united states government 1429nows that at least syrians were killed in this attack. >> the president himself says he has not made up his mind, and any u.s. response to the chemical attacks will be limited. >> we are not considering any open-ended commitments, any boots on the ground approach. >> saying goodbye to seamus mosty, one of the world's treasured poets, has died at the age of 74. >> welcome to
for equality and economic progress and issued a challenge to america -- to live up to its democratic ideals. how does america measure up today? i'll ask our guests, civil rights pioneer and georgia congressman john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and develop nor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rightses, the struggle of the middle classes, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous i have a dream speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secreta
big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >> this is just the beginning of something much bigger. >> thank god i didn't have to suffer what he had to go through. >> this sunday, the premiere of "into eternity". >> i am now in this place where you should never come. >> how do you contain 100,000 years of nuclear danger? >> it is an invisible danger. >> al jazeera america presents "into eternity". premieres sunday night 9 eastern. ... s ... my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was
in the past 50 years we have witnessed what i'd like to call the nonviolent revolution in america, a revolution of values, a revolution of ideas, and our country is a better country. >> you know, the president will speak on wednesday in the same spot. he'll mark 50 years since the i have a dream speech. we've talked over the years, and you told me about a year and a half ago in your view a lot of people can't get comfortable with the idea of an african-american president even though what a testament to the progress and the dream that dr. king had. and you even said during your speech yesterday there are forces, there are people who want to take us back. what specifically are you talking about? >> well, i hear people over and over again saying we want to take our country back. take it back where? where are we going? we need to go forward. we've made so much progress. i often think -- when i was growing up, i thought it was science that said white men, colored men, white women, colored women, colored waiting, those signs are gone. when i first came to washington in 1961, the same ye
's america. greg? >> andy, can you blame people in obama's america not wanting to run with the bulls? >> i am just surprised the bulls want to come here what with obamacare and all. >> exactly. >> and you can only use 49 bulls in assisted of 50. >> i think there are 58 bulls. >> eight won't be eligible for health care. >> enough of this. look who is here. she is so british her blood type is marmalade. i am here #w* imogen lloyd webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries" and if hilarity was a soap dispenser they would pump him in the office bathroom. he is writer examine comedian jake fogelnest. bill schulz is out of town and filling in is my nude rock climbing instructor, michael moynahan. glad you combed your hair. and he is not allowed within 50 feet of a hot air balloon. next to me, america's future foundation. that's not magestic. camille foster. >> a block. the lede. that's the first story. get ready for an hour's worth of tmi. >> will he be less graby after time and rehaby? well san diego mayor bob filner has started two weeks of intensive therapy as he faces calls for his
, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. mission. >>
. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stories. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >> this is just the beginning of something much bigger. >> thank god i didn't have to suffer what he had to go through. >> this sunday, the premiere of "into eternity". >> i am now in this place where you should never come. >> how do you contain 100,000 years of nuclear danger? >> it is an invisible danger. >> al jazeera america presents "into eternity". premieres sunday night 9 eastern. >> baltimore wasn't always a city in decline. it was once a shipping powerhouse, one of the largest seaports of the mid-atlantic states, and a major center of industrial manufacturing. >> in the late '60s, baltimore had industries like bethlehem steel, a huge ship-building industry, a very active port. >> neill franklin is a retired police major who spent 34 years in law enforcement. he
and every one of us, in unity, in unison, letting those who say that they managed this country of america know that it is the people. it is the voice and the actions of the people that say, we must overcome, and eventually say, we have overcome, because of the involvement of each and everyone. that is our challenge today. let us move for and do what we must do, remembering freedom is not free. we must work for it. [applause] >> peaceful coexistence was a hallmark of dr. king's teachings. he said we must learn to get to live as brothers or perish as fools. welcome the rev. christian stone, and the president of asian american advancing justice. >> greetings from the fellowship of reconciliation, working since 1915 to secure a world of justice and freedom from through nonviolence. today, 50 years after the march on washington, i pay tribute to the visionary organizer of the original march by rustin. as a fellowship of reconciliation staff, rustin co- founded and organized the first freedom ride in 1947. an african-american gay man, rustin was a quaker. his life commitment to nonviolence as a
in his book, i try to love america. but i cannot love things. no one in good health can. imagine a world of material wealth is devoid of people. i try to love america and its people, the dominant majority, their depiction of me and their treatment of mine. i have had to try to love america but they would not love the african whole of me. thus i could not love america. i have come to know that i have tried to love america's ideals and promise and process. these things could mean no more to me than they have to those that conceived them were written on were cited and ultimately betrayed them. then i stopped trying to love america. with that has come a measure of unexpected contentment that is settled upon me like an ancient ceremonial robe, warm and splendid, mislead but valued all the more for its belated retrieval. randall robinson, thank you for being with us. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> on this week's newsmakers, dana rohrabacher. he's chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on europe, eurasia, and emerging threats. we discussed a variety of foreign policy topics
in america but in the entire world, we need to know more about the world. so often we find the world knows more about us than we know about them. when i got to tanzania in 1970 i recall talking to a kid who was 14 years old, is name was godfrey and he approached me in the street and started talking to me about thomas jefferson and jeffersonian democracy and i was stunned because there were teachers i knew and americans generally you couldn't find tanzania on a matter. they know more about you than you know about them. that is sad. exceptionalism has cost us knowledge of much of the world. one can liken it to your years in high school when you knew the kids who finished ahead of you but you can't remember anybody in the class behind you. we happen to think people because they are for or less important, a sad state to be in. >> host: with all due respect, i think your words further in title many blacks to find excuse instead of getting to work and doing better. we all have our injustices' to overcome. you are speaking of 200 years ago. is >> guest: let me use human rights language. say the c
, but that is a dangerous belief, said the president. dr. king called america the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. he was right. and still is today. when profit motive and property rights are considered more important than people, he said, militarism is incapable of being conquered. a true revolution of values will look and easily on the glaring contrast to party and well. thise revelation will say way of settling differences is not just. american can lead the way in the revolution of values. no document can make these humans any less of our brothers. the true meaning of compassion and non-parlance is when it helps us to see the enemies point of view. there is nothing to prevent us from re- ordering our priorities. the pursuit of peace will take precedence over the pursuit of war. let us practice what they -- >> ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the national but justice coalition -- of the national black justice coalition. >> one of my mentors told me in order to truly be free, you must give to causes greater than yourself. every day, and educate, allocate, and celebrate the lot
. but it is forecast growth of 2.5%, still better than america's with 2%. let me give you more context. some better context. take a look at thea chylosis in dollars. the next five biggest economies cannot compete with america's size. china is growing much faster but the u.s. economy is almost double china's size. america's economy will almost never grow that fast, because of more mature economy typically doesn't. today we have been asking you how do you measure your personal growth. i looic this one from mike. he says by how much i can borrow. >> this viewer seems to agree. an increase means little if i can't keep up with costs. tell me what you think by tweeter@aj real money or leave us a comment on facebook. what was the biggest driver of the growth in this country. it was exports. exports account for almost 14% of our nation'sgdp. and ships this emto places like brazil and bermuda. david joins us now from his home, good to see you, sir, thank you for being with us. tell us a little about what you were -- what your business was before you discovered exports? well, it is a pleasure to talk to you.
struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the greaped, america needs a new marshall plan for our city to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's extra dation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he thought the -- sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace and equality. we must embrace that love and cease the violence. no more senseless newtown or columbines, no more daily killings of our young people by our young people on the streets of chicago and countless neighborhoods across the country. we need more gun control but we also need more love. yes, we all need love for each other, blarks white, and yellow, red and brown, gay and straight, christians muslims and jews. and all of god's children loving one another. we must embrace love and hold on to that powerful spiritual which inspired my father's generation and inspires us still today. we aren't going to let nobody turn us around. we aren't going to let n
and other opportunities that we're all hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. so recent studies have shown that throughout the united states, but also in iowa, that all growth in work force in the next 30 years will be attributable to immigrants, because of this demographic of retiring baby boomers and the generation coming after them. and of course also as i think senator harkin alluded to, we also need to not only fill jobs that are are currently here, but we need to create jobs, we need known vagues. and this is where immigrants have really contributed to america as well. immigrants are are more likely as a group to start businesses. immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they are working in the high tech industries and that, than native born counterparts. then finally we have to remember that we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from the rest of the world. and that's true for our economy. so therefore our economy is not a zero sum game, our work force is not a zero sum game. businesses and workers adapt to changing policies and changing circumstances.
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
the latest news online any time of day at www.aljazeera.com. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. >> we spent time with the gangster disciples. >> escape from the unexpected. >> i am a cancer survivor, not mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. inside of it. >> as the cries in syria plays out, rogue hackers have been busy with cyber attacks on the u.s. if you tried to go to "the new york times" website tuesday to get the latest on syria, you would have been directed to the syrian electric army instead manufacture it has been restored, but twitter accounts and even president obama's social media has been sit since the war in syria began. while it has been a nuisance, the threat o
syria. >> translator: >> this is part of america's plan to divide the middle east it started with iraq and now syria and this is an israel's interest. tra*p>> translator: it happenedn iraq and maybe in syria and maybe egypt. >> reporter: the syrian government promised to defend themself against attack. the fire in syria won't stop at its borders. al jazeera, beirut. >> the tinspection team in syria could take two weeks to release its report but the u.s. will wait on findings -- will it wait on findings before launching any attack. james is at the u.n. the ambassadors of the five members of the security council on their way to a meeting. this wasn't a formal session along the horseshoe table the final court of international security. the place where historically so many decision about global war and peace have been taken. instead, the last of the arrive at a meeting of the u.s. secretary general with the ambassador of the country will take security council. the weapons inspectors have made good progress taking samples of witness statements inside syria at the sight of the chemical attac
? >> and now, "bbc world news america." president obama cancels a moscow summit with president putin. this after russia grantor -- granted edwards snowden asylum, sending at chill through relations. throughoutg flights the region. it cost billions and has the backing of key countries. inside a project which could power the future. pairs of atoms and infusing them together. this will release more energy. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. today relations between the u.s. and russia and another snack when president obama canceled a planned meeting with president putin in russia next month. this comes just days after russia decided to grant asylum to the former intelligence analyst, edwards noted. -- edward snowden. two towering figures on the world stage. relations between russia and washington have never been more, has hadpresident obama a major diplomatic snub aimed at president putin. edward snowden is at the center of the latest round. the former contractor fled america after leaking government secrets. the u.s. is unhappy after russia g
talked to him on the program in depth. this is three hours. >> host: what does america owe blacks? >> guest: well, it owes them an acknowledgment of what happened. we don't like to talk about that in the states. even blast history month. there's a truncated version of what woodson had in mind. now it starts in slavely and moves forward and cuts us all from any access to african history. which was not what woodson intended. and so we obviously owe the value of our hire to those people who suffered so much and their families who dissented from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owe them something for that. we owe them the story. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good sound, psychology health. ashes and obliterated history. when i was a dmield richmond, virginia, we used to have a phrase that we used all the time from here to tim. but nobody knew what it was. nobody knew the providence of the world. didn't know where it was. didn't know it was a place. tim buck, which was a cross roads. it was also a site of one the world's first university. a
. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google
hand hand-out. >> awesome. >> taxpayers. >> so are all the hand-outs killing what made america great? good old fashioned hardwork? plus selling us out. government agencies making money off the private and the personal info. you won't believe what we found. and the opener of america's oldest brewery taking on big labor in a big way. and the reason job seekers on this holiday weekend. "cashin' in," working hard for you starts right now. ♪ ♪ >> eric: hi, everyone, i'm eric bolling. welcome to "cashin' in." the crew this week, wayne rogers, jonathan hoenig, michelle field, ebony k. williams. welcome, everybody. as we celebrate labor day this weekend let's open up a debate about the current state of labor in america. >> work is quickly replaced with hand-out and freebies. the recent report found in 35 states, welfare pays more than the minimum wage. that alone is driving the would-be workers to the open arm of our government. happy we feel recipient is a happy voter. what is the fall-out? welfare abusers, the takers are exploding. while the labor force, the makers are imploding. more
don't seem to be interested. >> welcome, everyone. >> al jazeera america makes its debut. will americans buy what they are selling? if dark clouds are bothering your white house, why not bring in something sunny? >> on the panel this week, writer and fox news contributor judy miller. syndicated columnist cal thompson. jim pinkerton. daily beast columnist kearse ton powers. fox news contributor richard grinnell. "fox news watch" is on right now. >> we can and must be more transparent. so i directed the intelligence community to make public as much information about these programs as possible. all these steps are designed to ensure that the american people can trust their efforts are in line with our interests and our values. to others around the world i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. intelligence is focused, above all, on finding the information that's necessary to protect our people and in many cases protect our allies. >> that was the president earlier this month trying to convince americans his administration i
to the middle east that's different from america. he takes pride in that and on the basis of that he's made allies. to give snowden, a highly symbolic figure given the surveillance issue would have collided with what putin's done in international affairs. but at home he has a political elite. forget society. the political elite didn't want him to make this concession to the united states. >> rose: we conclude with julian guthrie, a journalist who has written a book about larry ellison called "the billionaire and the mechanic." it details the story of his quest for the america's cup. >> and it was expected that larry would partner with a better-known yacht club on san francisco's waterfront, the st. francis yacht club. and there's a fun story in the book about what happened or what didn't happen between the st. francis and larry ellison. but it's a story that doesn't come along very often and i became became very enamored with the drama of the two men before i became interested in the america's cup. >> rose: egypt, russia and the america's cup when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose c
about coming to america. wide spread furry and december stress in distress over this in australia. >> there really has. disbelief, shock. chris was a rising star having the time of his life over in the united states. we've all heard about gun violence in america, but this really brought it home. parents in australia who may have children on scholarships in the u.s. and students themselves, just out of disbelief that could happen to one of ours. this is the front page in melbourne here today, "the herold son." it says the team's american police shot our star. it's senseless and the reaction from the family as well as reporting from that baseball club just north on melbourne here. family, friends and team mates and people from the local baseball club have been down there this week. terribly sad, they are placing a baseball with tributes, flowers on the home base. his mother and father held back tears and described chris as another normal kid. he loved baseball and the game since he was 15 years old and loved it because he wanted to go to college in the u.s., piers, and saw this was
for our pre game report. what is coming up on tonight's show? >> thanks, america's sweetheart. you are as adorable as ever. >> thank you. >> some members of the 1972 miami dolphins will be skipping a white house ceremony about their win. tonight's outrage hating panel is outraged. and a new poll which ask is the hottest, the dumbest, the craziest and more. our panel will insult all of you at one point or another. and sunny, the new portuguese water dog. i even want to hang out with the obamas on saturday night. >> thank you, we'll see you at the end. let's welcome our guest. despite what we put her through on this show she returns our e-mails and schools back. imogen lloyd webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries." and he is as talented as he is tall. it is jake fogelness. check it out on something called itunes. bill schulz. he thinks she on the set of "the good wife" right now. and proving that 99% in life is having a good name and great hair. next to me is buck sexton, not to be confused with the philanthropist. >> a block. the lede. that's the first story. >> what
bila for a pre game report. jedediah, what is coming up ongp tonight's show? >> thanks, america's sweetheart. you are as adorable as ever.v our top story, some members of ths e 1972 miami dolphins will be swimming a white house ceremonyny because they don't like obama's politics. welcome to the club, boys. are they principal and admirable or meanies out to hurt our president's feelings. >> and a new poll asks which are the hottest, dumbest,t, craziest and we will find out more. and finally you will meet sunny, the family's new dog. i even want to hang out with the obamas on saturday night. >> see you at the end. let's welcome our tabes. well, despite what we put herde through on this show for several years she still returns our e-mails asking her to come back. i am here with imogen lloydebbe webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries." and he is as talented as he is tall. she on the set of "the good wife" right now. and proving that 99% in life is having a good name and great hair. next to me is buck sexton, not to be confused with the philanthropist. >> a block. the
the news to your money real. jazeera america. >> i'm kim bondy, growing up in news was always important. you have this great product that you are ready to share with the country. i'm a part of a team that is moving in the same direction. content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> technology is coming on in the next few decades may make nuclear waste obsolete. we should all hope that's the case. but right now the international atomic energy agency expects the united states alone to produce at least 32,000 tons added to the pile. my next guess has made a documentary about the nuclear waste time will will air on al jazeera. if the problem can't be solved by new technology. it's directed by michael madsen who we will see in this clip explaining what it's all about. >> i am now in this place where you should never come
farland, and author of the knewly released book, "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy," thank you, both, for being here. >> thank you. >> thank you. lou: kt, starting with you, the idea that the president wants to reurn, the administration wants to return to a democratically elected president, which is precisely what the egyptian people have demonstrated they want no more of after a year, think you would know more. >> well, those are not the actions anymore. the actions is can the military establish some kind of order because the option is not military againstmocracy. it's the military maybe gets a little bit of order going, or you have chaos and potentially another civil war. i thought, by the way, the introduction was great. you set up the fact that we were for the mubarak government before we were against them, and then we were for the morsi government before we against it, and for the military government before we were against it now. lou: thank you, and the with the -- the "we" referred there is a reference to the obama administration. eric, in the book, you call for a move against
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
>>> good morning, america. and at this hour, momentum building for an american strike on the syrian armed forces. responsible for the chemical attack. the crucial phone call intercepted between those responsible, as the u.n. asked for more time to get weapon inspectors out. >>> i have a dream. >> 50 years after the march on washington. and one of the most famous speeches ever made, the president returns to the lincoln memorial today, with a renewed call on race equality in america right now. >> free at last. >>> breaking overnight. michael douglas and catherine zeta-jones separate after almost 13 years. insiders reveal the a-listers are taking a break. what's driven one of hollywood's high-wattage couples apart? >>> and meet the new american teen phenom shooting to stardom overnight. her father once trapped under the rubble of a massive earthquake, cheering her on. this morning, victoria duval's cinderella story. >>> and good morning, america. so many developments happening right now. this just in, the first confirmation from the u.n. team in syria. that civilians were attacked by a
, in this place, at this time 50 years ago today, dr. martin luther king shared his dream for america with america. dr. king was the passionate voice that awakened the conscience of a nation. and inspired people all over the world. the power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom and justice, equality and opportunity for all. let freedom ring was dr. king's closing call for a better and more just america. so today people from all walks of life will gather at 3:00 p.m. for bell ringing events across our great country and around the world as we reaffirm our commitment to dr. king's ideals. dr. king believed that our destinies are all intertwined. and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. he challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. so as the bells of freedom ring today, we are hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made, and we've made a lot, but on what we have accomplished, and also on the work that still remains before us. it's an opportunity today
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
will start with violence in egypt. bret stephens and peter beinart disagree as usual. >>> then, is america overregulated? does the government have altogether too much of a say in how we live our lives? i'll ask the man who put many of the obama administration's regulations in place, cass c sunstein. >>> also underneath the violence, is the arab world the new start-up society? that's what an american venture capitalist believes. and while we're at innovation, is north korea going to beat apple at its own game? obviously no, but i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. if there is one crisis that both the american left and right agree is real, it is of declining mobility. the american dream is at heart that someone no matter his or her background can make it in this country. a few weeks ago, four economists at harvard and the university of california at berkeley released a path-breaking study of mobility within the united states. and last week, the "journal of economic perspectives" published a series of essays tackling the question from an international perspective. the research is ca
in my power to make sure this law works as it's supposed to. because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. and we're going to keep it that way. >> the number one concern of americans is obamacare. >> obama and the democrats have turned the american people, particularly when it comes to health care, into servants of government. >> the american people wanted health care reform because they wanted affordable care. and what we're seeing under this health care law is that the cost of care is actually going up. >> because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. >> there are many conservatives standing up and saying, look, obamacare is going to be a disaster for the country. >> because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. >> as i travel around kentucky and around the country, people come up to me and say stand firm, stand up, try to stop this monstrosity, it's going to be bad for the country. >> i can tell you there was a popular physician at my town
the nation. 1963od with dr. king in when he called on america to be true to its principles. five years later, dr. king stood without me in the sanitation workers of local 1733 demanded justice, dignity and respect. the journey for civil rights, workers rights and economic rights began almost in the moment america was born. it gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned standup, fight back and march forward. because our struggle continues, we come to this but mario not only to commemorate -- this memorial, not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. we have a power to carry determination, hope and passion of the march on washington forward. we must also have the courage. when must also have the courage. in the name of dr. king, a philip randolph, bayard rustin, john lewis. on behalf of those whose names will never be known. we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor , to the ceo and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. we have the responsibility to
their government for redress, and to awaken america's long-slumbering conscience. we rightly and best remember dr. king's soaring oratory that day, how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. his words belong to the ages possessing a power and prophesy unmatched in our time. but we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose named never appeared in the history books, never got on tv. many had gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters. they lived in towns where they couldn't vote and cities where their votes didn't matter. there were couples in love who couldn't marry, soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. they had seen loved ones beaten and children fire hosed, and they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. and yet they chose a different path. in the face of hatred, they prayed for their tormenters. in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in with the moral force of nonv
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,424 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)